Dealing with Digital Assets After Death: Creating a Trusted Contact

Digital Assets
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Most of us are digitally connected on several platforms, which means we have multiple lines of electronic communication, personal information online, and multiple digital records. When doing your estate planning, digital assets should be considered right along with your financial assets and personal property. If your digital legacy is not prepared ahead of time, your loved ones may not be able to access old photos or protect private information. The digital assets to keep in mind are your email accounts, social media accounts, online subscriptions, icloud, and loyalty programs. 

Google Trusted Contact:  Google has created a service for people to set up instructions for what happens to your information when you pass. The Google Inactive Account Manager kicks in after your account has been inactive for a designated amount of time. You will set up who gains access to your accounts and what they should do with it, so that when the time comes (your account has been inactive), Google can send that person secure access to your instructions. A link will be sent to your trusted person for the information that you wish to share.

Facebook Legacy Contact:  Facebook’s legacy contact is a feature that allows you to set a contact that will be able to manage your account after you pass. Make sure to tell your legacy contact that they are the chosen one, because someone must notify Facebook of your passing before it sends out the way to take over. To protect your account, there are specific restrictions that the legacy cannot do, such as read your messages or completely log into your account. 

Apple Legacy Contact: Apple also allows you to designate responsibility to a specific contact for after you pass. The contact will receive an access code when you initiate your legacy plan, so make sure to add this code to your list. They will have a limited amount of time to collect the information that they want to keep or access. Financial information, like keychain or apple pay, will not be accessible but your photos, messages, and emails will be.

Conclusion:  Make sure you know the restrictions or amount of information your trusted person is going to have access to and tailor your list or your account setting to fit what you are comfortable with leaving behind. Your digital legacy is more important than ever before and should be left in good hands. 

When you have your complimentary consultation with us about your estate plan, we will discuss any of your digital asset concerns thoroughly.  Give us a call today!  727.231.1540 or email assistant@lizmoneymakerlaw.com 

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